Common folk quotes – Commonfolk Using Common Sense http://commonfolkusingcommonsense.com/ Thu, 17 Nov 2022 09:33:45 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://commonfolkusingcommonsense.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-99.png Common folk quotes – Commonfolk Using Common Sense http://commonfolkusingcommonsense.com/ 32 32 75 Best Quotes About Writing https://commonfolkusingcommonsense.com/75-best-quotes-about-writing/ Tue, 15 Nov 2022 20:49:20 +0000 https://commonfolkusingcommonsense.com/75-best-quotes-about-writing/ If you’re a writer, you know the joy that comes from expressing yourself on paper. Whether you’re journaling, writing an essay, or have become a published author, writing can have its challenges. In times of writer’s block or lack of inspiration, a little encouragement can go a long way. And there’s nothing more inspiring than […]]]>

If you’re a writer, you know the joy that comes from expressing yourself on paper. Whether you’re journaling, writing an essay, or have become a published author, writing can have its challenges. In times of writer’s block or lack of inspiration, a little encouragement can go a long way. And there’s nothing more inspiring than the wise words that come straight from bestselling authors. That’s why we’ve compiled this list of write quotes. Each of them offers something in terms of encouragement, inspiration, motivation or humor.

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Celebrate Kurt Vonnegut’s 100th birthday with a collection of songs based on his work https://commonfolkusingcommonsense.com/celebrate-kurt-vonneguts-100th-birthday-with-a-collection-of-songs-based-on-his-work/ Fri, 11 Nov 2022 09:04:49 +0000 https://commonfolkusingcommonsense.com/celebrate-kurt-vonneguts-100th-birthday-with-a-collection-of-songs-based-on-his-work/ There is a passage from Kurt Vonnegut Breakfast of champions that crosses our desk a lot at this time of year. This is the one in which he declares sacred the day of the armistice, which coincidentally falls on his birthday: What else is sacred? Oh, Romeo and Juliet, for example. And all music is. […]]]>

There is a passage from Kurt Vonnegut Breakfast of champions that crosses our desk a lot at this time of year. This is the one in which he declares sacred the day of the armistice, which coincidentally falls on his birthday:

What else is sacred? Oh, Romeo and Juliet, for example.

And all music is.

Here here!

Hopefully Shakespeare won’t take umbrage if we jump on his doomed teenage lovers to celebrate Kurt Vonnegut’s 11/11 centenary with songs inspired by his work.

Take Kilgore Trout Experience’s tribute to the Sirens of Titan, above.

The driving force behind the KTE Tim Langsford, a drummer who mentors students with autism at Plymouth University, was looking for ways to help his “foggy mind remember key concepts, characters and memorable lines that occur in each” of Vonnegut’s 14 books. .

The solution? Community and responsibility for an ongoing mission. Langsford launched the Plymouth Vonnegut Collective in 2019 with a typescript manifesto, inviting interested parties to read (or re-read) the novels in the order they were published, and then come together for monthly discussions.

His highest goal was for the members of the book club to work collaboratively on a 14-track concept album inspired by their readings.

They stuck to it, with efforts spanning a variety of genres.

Mother Night could cause your ears to bleed.

The psychedelic God bless you, Mr. Rosewater mixes quotes from the book with edited clips of the collective’s discussion of the novel.

The project brought Langsford out from behind the drums, as well as out of his comfort zone:

It took me a long time to get comfortable with the songs I sing on. However, I tried to invoke The meaning of creating KV as if no one was watching. It’s okay so do it for yourself…. Although I contradict this by sharing these things on the Internet rather than throwing them without seeing or hearing them? !

Ah, but isn’t this one of the most beautiful uses of the Internet as a tool for discovering what we have in common with our fellow human beings?

Congratulations to our fellow Vonnegut fans in Plymouth, who will be celebrating their achievement and the legendary author’s 100th birthday with an event featuring poetry, art, music and film inspired by the boy’s novels. ‘anniversary.

Folk rocker Al Stewart is another who “was drawn to the Titan Sirens.” The lyrics make perfect sense if the novel is fresh in your mind:

But here in the yellow and blue of my days

I wander in the endless Mercurian caves

Watching the signs the Harmonians make

The words on the walls

The lyrics to Nice, Nice, Very Nice by Stewart’s peers at Ambrosia are taken directly from the scriptures of Bokononism, the religion invented by Vonnegut in The cat’s cradle.

The band gave the author writing credit. He repaid the compliment with a fan letter:

I was at my daughter’s last night, and the radio was on. By God if the DJ didn’t play our song, and said it was number ten in New York, and said how good you guys are in general. You can imagine the pleasure it gave me. Luck has played a huge role in my life. People who know pop music keep telling me how lucky I am to be related to you. And I myself am crazy about our song, of course, but what do I know and why wouldn’t I be? What I always knew, anyway: music is the only art that is really worthwhile. I envy you guys.

If that’s not nice, we don’t know what is.

Vonnegut’s best-known work, the time-traveling, eternally banned anti-war novel, Slaughterhouse-Five, presents an irresistible songwriting challenge, judging by the number of tracks that have sprouted from its fertile soil.

Susan Hwang is uniquely immersed in all things Vonnegut, as the founder of the Bushwick Book Club, a loose collective of musicians who meet monthly to present songs inspired by a shortlisted title – including nearly every novel by Vonnegut’s work, as well as the news in Welcome to the Monkey House and trials including A man without a country.

She was a 2022 Kurt Vonnegut Museum & Library Banned Books Week Artist-in-Residence.

She titled her recent Vonnegut-inspired five-song EP, Everything is Satina nod to the Sateen Dura-Luxe house paint that Vonnegut abstract expressionist Rabo Karabekian favors in Blue Beard.

We’re pretty confident that Hwang’s No Answer, offered above as a thank you to backers of a recent tour, will be the most dynamic adaptation of Slaughterhouse-Five you will hear all day.

Keep listening.

Sweet Soubrette, aka Ellia Bisker, another Bushwick Book Club figure and one half of goth-folk duo Charming Disaster, delved into the horrors of Dresden for her Slaughterhouse-Five contribution, name-checking rubble, barbed wire, and the breath of “mustard gas and roses” born from one night’s heavy drinking.

My Blue Heaven: The Love Song of Montana Wildhack by musicologist songwriter Gail Sparlin – seen here in a library performance – is as feminine and sweet as Valerie Perrine’s take on the character in George Roy Hill’s 1972 film Slaughterhouse-Five.

In 1988, Hawkwind’s The War I Survived permeated Slaughterhouse-Five with very New Wave synths…

The chorus of Sam Ford’s melancholy So It Goes taps into the time travel aspect of the novel and evokes the challenges many soldiers face when trying to reintegrate into their pre-combat lives:

It’s not the way back

Who said I wanted to go home?
I’m always at home
I am still at home.

Having invoked Vonnegut’s evergreen phrase, it’s impossible to walk away without mentioning Nick Lowe’s 1976 power pop hit, however tenuously that may create a connection.

Hi!

Still, tenuous connections can count as connections, especially when you count all references to The cat’s cradleThe government’s secret weapon, Ice Nine, in lyrics and band names.

Then there are submerged references. We may not notice them, but we’re ready to believe they’re there.

Pearl Jam frontman Eddie Vedder wrote that “books like Cat’s Cradle, God Bless You, Mr. Rosewater, piano player…they’ve had as much influence on me as any record I’ve ever owned.

He also won a permanent place in the karass by distributing copies of Blue Beard to attendees of the 4th Annual Kokua Festival to benefit environmental education in Hawaii.

A memorable Breakfast of champions The artwork would have ignited a flame with New Order, propelling Vonnegut onto the dance floor.

And Ringo Starr blasted his way to Beatles favorite status when he tipped his hat at Breakfast of championsdedicating his 1973 solo album to “Kilgore Trout and all the beavers”.

There are dozens more we could mention – you’ll find a few in the playlist below – but without further ado, let’s welcome Special K and his crew to the stage!

Yes, that’s Phish drummer (and huge Vonnegut fan) Jon Fishman on vacuum.

But who is this mysterious leader, spitting Chaucer Canterbury Tales?

Happy 100th, Kurt Vonnegut! We are happy that you were born.

Related content

Kurt Vonnegut maps the shape of all stories in a master’s thesis rejected by U. Chicago

Kurt Vonnegut offers 8 tips on how to write great short stories (and amusingly depicts the forms these stories can take)

Kurt Vonnegut gives advice to aspiring writers in a 1991 TV interview

Kurt Vonnegut: Where do I get my ideas from? My distaste for civilization

Ayun Halliday is the chief primatologist of East Village Inky zine and author, most recently, of Creative, Not Famous: The Little Potato Manifesto. Join her for a free Vonnegut Centennial Fanzine workshop at the Kurt Vonnegut Museum & Library on November 19. @AyunHalliday.

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50th CJI Chandrachud part of landmark verdicts in Ayodhya dispute over adultery right to privacy https://commonfolkusingcommonsense.com/50th-cji-chandrachud-part-of-landmark-verdicts-in-ayodhya-dispute-over-adultery-right-to-privacy/ Wed, 09 Nov 2022 07:14:59 +0000 https://commonfolkusingcommonsense.com/50th-cji-chandrachud-part-of-landmark-verdicts-in-ayodhya-dispute-over-adultery-right-to-privacy/ (Eds: Added quotes, photos) New Delhi, Nov 9 (PTI) Justice Dhananjaya Y Chandrachud, who took office as India’s 50th Chief Justice on Wednesday, has played a pivotal role in digitizing the judiciary and was among the benches that made historic verdicts on issues such as the Ayodhya Land Dispute, Article 377 and the right to […]]]>

(Eds: Added quotes, photos)
New Delhi, Nov 9 (PTI) Justice Dhananjaya Y Chandrachud, who took office as India’s 50th Chief Justice on Wednesday, has played a pivotal role in digitizing the judiciary and was among the benches that made historic verdicts on issues such as the Ayodhya Land Dispute, Article 377 and the right to privacy.
The longest serving supreme court justice follows in the footsteps of his father and former Chief Justice of India, the late YV Chandrachud, who was head of the bench from February 22, 1978 to July 11, 1985 and was the CJI on oldest in India. It is the first time that a father and his son occupy the highest place of justice.
CJI Chandrachud, often referred to as DYC in legal circles, was sworn in by President Draupadi Murmu. He succeeds Uday Umesh Lalit, who recommended him as his successor at the Center on October 11.
Unlike its predecessor who served for 74 days, the new Indian CJI will serve for two years until November 10, 2024. Supreme Court justices retire at the age of 65.
Justice Chandracud, born on November 11, 1959 and considered a product of Delhi University who studied at St Stephen’s College and Campus Law Center before going to Harvard, was elevated to the highest court on May 13, 2016 .
Considered a judge who enriched the supreme court’s “verdict report”, Justice Chandrachud is seen as sharp, articulate and forward-looking. Supposed to advance the judicial frontiers, he was a member of the benches which rendered judgments on the decriminalization of part of section 377 of the Indian penal code and the entry of women into the Sabarimala temple.
The list of important judgments that have settled many debates is long.
It was also part of a landmark verdict expanding the scope of the Medical Termination of Pregnancy Act and related rules to include unmarried women for abortion between 20 and 24 weeks of pregnancy.
Justice Chandrachud was among two Supreme Court bench judges who recently objected to the “circulation” method adopted to obtain the opinions of its members on the appointment of judges to the superior court.
During the COVID-19 pandemic, a bench headed by Justice Chandrachud took several directions to address the miseries people are facing while calling the second wave a “national crisis.” The bench, for example, ordered the Center to ensure oxygen supplies to hospitals across the country for proper treatment of patients.
Known as a doer, he chaired a bench that worked five hours beyond normal working hours on September 30, 2022 to hear 75 cases to clean up the council before the start of the Dussehra holiday.
In a landmark verdict in February 2020, a bench headed by Judge Chandrachud ordered that female army officers be granted permanent commission and command positions, dismissing the Center’s position on physiological limitations as being based on “gender stereotypes” and “gender discrimination against women”. “.
Later, a bench headed by Justice Chandrachud also paved the way for the granting of a permanent commission to women officers in the Indian Navy, saying that a level playing field ensures that women are given the opportunity to overcome the ” stories of discrimination”.
He served on several benches of the Constitution.
Justice Chandrachud was part of a bench of five Constitutional Justices that on November 9, 2019, in a unanimous verdict, paved the way for the construction of a Ram temple at the disputed site of Ayodhya and ordered the Center to allocate five acres of land to the Sunni Waqf Board for the construction of a mosque.
He also wrote the lead judgment for a bench of nine judges of the Constitution in the case of Justice K.S. Puttaswamy v Union of India in which the right to privacy was unanimously held to be a fundamental right under the Constitution .
Judge Chandrachud was a member of the five-judge bench of the Constitution that unanimously decriminalized part of the 158-year-old colonial law under Section 377, which criminalizes unnatural consensual sex between consenting adults, claiming that they violated equality rights.
Another bench of five judges, including Judge Chandrachud, unanimously ruled that Article 497 of the ICC, which criminalized adultery, was unconstitutional on the grounds that it was arbitrary, archaic and violated the right to equality and privacy.
In a strong dissent, Justice Chandrachud disagreed with other members of a five-judge constitutional bench that, by a majority verdict, upheld the constitutional validity of the Aadhaar unique biometric identity number. He ruled that Aadhaar was unconstitutional and violated fundamental rights.
He concurred with the majority verdict in the Sabarimala case saying that the practice of barring women of menstruating age from entering the Sabarimala temple was discriminatory and violated women’s human rights.
Additionally, Judge Chandrachud was part of a landmark judgment by a bench of five Constitutional Justices that recognized the “living will” written by terminally ill patients for passive euthanasia.
A bench headed by Judge Chandrachud ordered the demolition of Supertech’s 40-storey twin towers at its Emerald project in Noida, which were found to be illegal for violating standards.
In November 2020, he led a bench granting bail to journalist Arnab Goswami in a 2018 suicide aiding and abetting case, saying it would be a “travesty of justice” if personal freedom was curtailed.
In July this year, a bench led by him ordered the release of Alt News co-founder Mohammad Zubair on bail in all FIRs filed in Uttar Pradesh against him for alleged hate speech, saying that “the exercise of the power of arrest must be continued”. sparingly” and transferred all cases from Uttar Pradesh to Delhi.
“Serving ordinary people is my priority…I will work for all citizens of the country. Whether it is in technology or in the register…or in judicial reforms, I will take care of the citizens in all aspects,” , he told reporters after being sworn in.
Justice Chandrachud served as Chief Justice of Allahabad High Court from October 31, 2013 until his elevation to Supreme Court.
He served as a judge of the Bombay High Court from 29 March 2000 until his appointment as Chief Justice of the Allahabad High Court.
He was appointed Senior Solicitor by the Bombay High Court in June 1998 and became Additional Solicitor General the same year.
After graduating with an Honors BA in Economics from St Stephen’s College, Delhi, Justice Chandracud completed his LL.B. from Campus Law Center, University of Delhi and earned a Master of Laws degree and a Doctorate of Juridical Science ( SJD) from Harvard Law School, USA.
Justice Chandrachud, who is married with two daughters, practiced law in the Supreme Court and High Court in Bombay and was a visiting professor of comparative constitutional law at the University of Mumbai. PTI ABA SJK MIN
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Sweet Reason and the Spirits of Discord ~ ​​The Imaginative Conservative https://commonfolkusingcommonsense.com/sweet-reason-and-the-spirits-of-discord-the-imaginative-conservative/ Fri, 04 Nov 2022 18:27:15 +0000 https://commonfolkusingcommonsense.com/sweet-reason-and-the-spirits-of-discord-the-imaginative-conservative/ A radical polarization is happening today. Knowing better, people interpret others as short-sighted and selfish, demonize their affiliations, and plague them with imputed evil. The difficult question we face is political: how long can we maintain our constitutional forms? The even more difficult question, however, is what it means to follow Christ’s law of love. […]]]>

A radical polarization is happening today. Knowing better, people interpret others as short-sighted and selfish, demonize their affiliations, and plague them with imputed evil. The difficult question we face is political: how long can we maintain our constitutional forms? The even more difficult question, however, is what it means to follow Christ’s law of love.

Another election is approaching, which means accusations, distortions and misunderstandings, often deliberate, dominate public discourse. It’s easy to become bitter when you see your own reasonable opinion twisted and distorted. But it helps to put our polarized situation into context. A book I recently read about Atlanta during the Civil War unexpectedly sheds some light on our contemporary scene. In part of Bonfire: The Siege and Burning of Atlanta, Mark Wortman shows how secession fever came to Atlanta.

As an epigraph to these chapters, Wortman quotes a famous passage from Thucydides History of the Peloponnesian War, which our freshmen at Wyoming Catholic College read in the spring semester. The hatred between the common people and the rich oligarchs of Corcyra at the start of the Peloponnesian War was so radical that “the words had to change their ordinary meaning and take what was now given to them. Reckless audacity came to be seen as the courage of a staunch follower; cautious hesitation, specious cowardice; moderation was seen as a mantle for manhood; ability to see all sides of an issue inability to act on any. Frenzied violence has become the attribute of manhood. In such circumstances, the word “good” means whatever serves one’s own interests. In Atlanta in 1860 and 1861, there were many people—in fact, even many slave owners—who considered themselves part of the Union, enjoying the American heritage of George Washington and the Founding Fathers. Their reluctance to join the secessionist movement puts them increasingly at odds with the vehement majority around them. Over time, simply to survive, they fell silent or converted to the secessionist cause. Any hint of an unacceptable opinion could result in physical harm or financial ruin.

A similar radical polarization is happening today. In local communities, among old friends and within families, the opportunities for deliberate misunderstandings multiply. Knowing better, people interpret others as myopic and selfish, irrationally committed to ideas that they have basically absorbed through propaganda. Soon it becomes easy not to listen to them, easy to avoid them or perhaps to reject them altogether, to demonize their affiliations and stain them with imputed evil.

“Reason” then becomes what Thomas Hobbes calls: the slave of the passions. Taking a step back, being able to look at situations with objectivity, would make it possible to bring out real causes and real intentions – but who can achieve objectivity when the disagreements are so deep? Those who try to exercise true reason, sweet reason, find themselves in these circumstances despised as weak, whereupon pride might embitter them to rage and hardening of heart. It is almost a truism to say that the issue of abortion is today what slavery was in 1861. The participants of the different camps in the public demonstrations have nothing in common, as is often said, for there can be no fruitful conversation when assumptions about property and human life are discussed. so radically different.

For all abortion advocates, from socialist to libertarian, the body is private property in its most concentrated form. Women can engage in any sexual activity they choose because they own their bodies, but an unexpected baby is a criminal intruder. They want the right to stand their ground and kill the intruder. In contrast, those who oppose abortion understand bodily existence as given, and they believe that life should be governed by openness to God’s will. It’s easy to take a step back and congratulate yourself on having the right opinions, like the Pharisee who compares himself to the publican, but nothing is simple here. Every real situation has more complications and complexities than we care to admit. Most women who abort do so, not out of assertive ideology, but out of desperation. Circumstances have forced them to make terrible choices, and at the crucial moment, they have no hope that the life inside them won’t drag them both to a living hell. And yet the people and places that can and do offer real hope of help, real alternatives, have been attacked as if they exist only to deprive women of their property rights.

In his book on Lincoln and the Civil War, Harry Jaffa writes that “people intoxicated by their own supremacy” come to see constitutional forms as “barriers to their rights.” In short, they “tend to identify these rights with their passions and to oppose the obstacles as if they were obstacles to their rights”. The difficult question we face is political: how long can we maintain our constitutional forms? The even more difficult question, however, is what it means to follow Christ’s law of love. Saint Charles Borromeo, whose Memorial stands today, reminds us to “bear the faults of others at home and elsewhere, as you wish others to bear you”. Specifically, he writes, “Be not easily disposed to judge your neighbor, especially his intentions, but keep your eyes on your own sins and faults. You’d think we could do it on our own, but that’s the sweet reason God had to die to bring us.

Republished with kind permission from Wyoming Catholic College Weekly Bulletin (April 2018).

The imaginative curator applies the principle of appreciation to the discussion of culture and politics – we approach dialogue with magnanimity rather than mere civility. Will you help us remain a refreshing oasis in the increasingly contentious arena of modern discourse? Please consider donating now.

Image featured is “The Jews took stones to stone Jesus” (between 1886 and 1896) by James Tissot, and is in the public domain, courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

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A review: Starry Messenger – Cosmic Perspectives on Civilization (2022) https://commonfolkusingcommonsense.com/a-review-starry-messenger-cosmic-perspectives-on-civilization-2022/ Thu, 03 Nov 2022 01:03:10 +0000 https://commonfolkusingcommonsense.com/a-review-starry-messenger-cosmic-perspectives-on-civilization-2022/ Posted on November 2, 2022 By Bob Thomas To gain a fresher perspective on the state of our current human being, I took a step in space with astrophysicist/educator Neil DeGrasse Tyson as my starry Messenger. His book opens with the perspective of an astronaut: You instantly develop a global awareness, an orientation towards people, […]]]>

By Bob Thomas

To gain a fresher perspective on the state of our current human being, I took a step in space with astrophysicist/educator Neil DeGrasse Tyson as my starry Messenger. His book opens with the perspective of an astronaut:

You instantly develop a global awareness, an orientation towards people, an intense dissatisfaction with the state of the world, and a compulsion to do something on this subject.

From up there on the moon, international politics looks so petty. You want grab a politician by the scruff of the neck and drag him a quarter of a million miles away and say, “Look at this, you son of a bitch.”

—Edgar D. Mitchell, Apollo 14 astronaut

Star messenger is a wake-up call for civilization,” according to the preface to the book, which further advises viewing the book as a treasure trove of ideas, informed by the Universe and contributed by the methods and tools of science.

The message is composed of ten chapters, each offering a scientific meditation on two topics: Science & Reality, Truth & Beauty, Exploration & Discovery, Earth & Moon, Conflict & Resolution, Risk & Reward, Meats & Vegetarians, Gender & Identity, Color & Race, Law & Order and Body & Mind.

In examining these dualities, Tyson’s engaging writing offers unexpected revelations, which in my case exposed some of my own confirmation biases in examining fact and fiction. New perspectives always offer challenges to the respective dogmatisms. Such is the value of learning. Tyson the educator is a big fan of learning, curiosities and humanity.

Cover of Starry Messenger by Neil deGrasse

In his analyzes and scientific reflections on Gender & Identity as well as Color & Race, Tyson nails with solid facts and critical thinking the essential truth that people are more similar than not. Anyone who has traveled has a hunch about Tyson’s findings.

Subtitle The calculations we make daily with our own lives and those of othersthe Risk & Reward chapter, confronted with some of my mathematical and cosmological knowledge gaps regarding the importance of numbers in critical scientific thinking, specifically statistics and probabilities. The author offers several illuminating examples analytical powers of probability. His introduction to the game is a choice race through the scam against the very real odds involved in the game equations.

In 1986, 4,000 astrophysicists gathered at the MGM Grand Marina Hotel in Las Vegas for a congress. The hotel was and remains the largest hotel in the world with 7,000 rooms. If I was smarter mathematically, I could conjure up what the casino takes maybe with 4,000 new guests for a week. But I wouldn’t have predicted this past. The problem with my calculations would not have been the numbers, but what these numbers represented.

“Scientists,” says Tyson, “are humans too, but the extensive math training slowly rewires those irrational parts of the brain, leaving us a little less sensitive to exploitation.”

What happened in Vegas was that the hotel made less money than the week before -already.

“Could it be,” Tyson conjectures, “that physicists know probabilities so well that they increased their odds against the casino in poker, roulette, craps and slots and came out victorious? No. They just didn’t play. Physicists have been inoculated with play with math.

Law and Order Review, subtitle The foundation of civilization, like it or not notTyson’s ideas are interspersed with examples from the history of our legal system and its deficiencies here in real time.

“In court,” reports Tyson, “if truth and objectivity are neither sought nor desired, then we must admit (confess?) to ourselves that at least some parts of the justice system are the opposite of Aristotle’s edict, and are instead sentiment-oriented and emotions. A quest to transform passion into compassion. The trials have become persuasive passion plays rather than courts of law and justice in Tyson’s criticism analysis

A key element of Tyson’s ideas is people willing to learn. He quotes XIX- century, the British essayist Walter Bagehot: “One of the greatest pains in human nature is the pain of a new idea. He further explains: “It is, as is common people say, so “upsetting”; it makes you think that after all your favorite notions maybe wrong, your strongest beliefs ill-founded…. Naturally, therefore, ordinary men hate a new idea, and are more or less willing to mistreat the original man who bring it.

The book’s coda, Life & Death, is priceless wisdom and a clarified conclusion to Tyson’s Wonderful Meditations on What Is and What Isn’t, and Why Use Science analysis and methodologies can offer a very illuminating critical reflection on life, death and humanity. He quotes the 19th century educator Horace Mann epitaph as a fitting tombstone and a life worth living: “I beg you to cherish in your hearts these my parting words. Be ashamed to die before you win victory for humanity.

Star messenger ends with a realistic cosmological observation as to here and now.

Our primary urge to keep looking up is surely greater than our primary urge to keep killing each other. If so, then human curiosity and wonder, the twin chariots of cosmic discovery, will ensure that the starry messages continue to arrive. These ideas oblige it is up to us, during our short stay on Earth, to become better shepherds our own civilization. Yes, life is better than death. Life is also better than having never born. But each of us is alive against prodigious odds. We won the lottery—one time only. We manage to invoke our faculties of reason to understand how the world works. But we can also smell the flowers. We get to bask in the divine sunsets and sunrises, and gaze deeply at the night sky they cradle. We arrive at live, and ultimately die, in this glorious universe.

EVM columnist Bob Thomas can be reached at captzero@sbcglobal.net.

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A Listening Guide: Malek Jandali – Symphony No. 6, “The Desert Rose” https://commonfolkusingcommonsense.com/a-listening-guide-malek-jandali-symphony-no-6-the-desert-rose/ Mon, 31 Oct 2022 12:57:31 +0000 https://commonfolkusingcommonsense.com/a-listening-guide-malek-jandali-symphony-no-6-the-desert-rose/ A Guide to Malek Jandali’s Symphony No. 6, “The Desert Rose”, presented by Jack Pepper Like the museum building and the natural phenomenon that inspired it, Jandali’s symphony is constructed as a complex interlocking structure. There are nine movements, mirroring the jagged nine-point line on the flag of Qatar. This overall structure brings together […]]]>


A Guide to Malek Jandali’s Symphony No. 6, “The Desert Rose”, presented by Jack Pepper

Like the museum building and the natural phenomenon that inspired it, Jandali’s symphony is constructed as a complex interlocking structure. There are nine movements, mirroring the jagged nine-point line on the flag of Qatar. This overall structure brings together three musical forms, woven right through: it’s sort of three pieces in one. Movements two, three, five and seven form a Qatari symphonic suite, with melodies and rhythms based on regional folk dances. Movements one, four, six and nine together form a traditional classical four-movement symphony. These two ideas are combined in the eighth movement; two become one, heralding a grand finale. It’s a symphony of dialogues: east meets west, old meets new, land meets sea, street meets concert hall, man meets nature. If architecture is frozen music, then this symphony is a unique monument in itself.

Malek Jandali Symphony No. 6 “The Desert Rose”

ORF Vienna Radio Symphony Orchestra / Marin Alsop condition

I. Epigraph: Grandioso

Crashing drums and frenzied rhythms lay the foundations of our musical edifice. The Desert Rose theme is introduced. It reminds me of the language of John Adams, with its regular pulsations and prominent percussion. This is the first section of the traditional four-movement “symphony”, which will be repeated in the fourth movement.

II. Praise: Con Moto

Based on a devotional chant used to call people to worship, this movement is the first of four that draws inspiration from Qatari folk music and sounds unique to the region. The opening drums represent the Misahharati, someone who wanders the streets a few hours before dawn and plays the drum to wake people up during Ramadan. This precise rhythm continues below while the strings and brass strike up a freewheeling melodic line above, evoking a vocal improvisation; here, the orchestra becomes the human voice. As Jandali told me: “Usually the songs have no instruments, just a human voice with some percussion instruments. Trying to emulate the beauty of human sound through the orchestra was very rewarding. This is the magic of the symphony orchestra. When you have seventy humans united in common purpose, you think together… you come together with all of your differences, all of that counterpoint. You are different but harmonious. This is the message.

III. The sea: Allegretto

A playful bassoon, tremolo strings and a floating flute suggest the gentle movement of the waves, while later sudden bursts of energy and crashing cymbals suggest the swell of the sea. The melody quotes one of the songs Qatar’s most famous sea coast, “Umm Al Hanaya”, which means “Mother of curves”. It is associated with Qatari boats that traveled around the Persian Gulf and beyond in search of pearls; it is said to have been sung by women, addressing the pearl divers on board about the adventures and dangers they faced on their journeys.

IV. Nocturne: Andante

It is the slow movement of the classical symphony in four movements. Here we have an image of the sea and the desert of Qatar at night. At its heart is a violin solo, a solitary high voice that floats above a dark background like a twinkling star in the night sky. For a brief moment, the nocturnal calm gives way to a rhythmic dance, punctuated by drums with a dance in Arabic mode overhead; it soon descends into long, slow notes and the stillness of the night.

V. Ardah: Moderate

The Arda is a dance of Qatari men armed with swords, accompanied by percussion and poetry; it is used to represent Qatari unity. Jandali replaces swords with the bows of stringed instruments, making this celebration of unity a call for peace. This is represented by the instruments coming together at the end to play the melody in unison, fortissimo, all the instruments singing the same line over the beat of the drums. In 2015, the Arda the sword dance was added to UNESCO’s list of intangible cultural heritage, which traces local traditions and celebrates cultural diversity in a context of increasing globalization; through sound, this symphony also helps to root these regional traditions for generations to come.

VI. Scherzo: Lively

Just as the scherzo offers a moment of light relief in the traditional four-movement symphony, here we have a danceable melody and upbeat rhythms. A children’s folk song is the inspiration; the air ‘Al Karnakouh’ is sung by children one evening in the middle of Ramadan, when they go to get presents from the neighbours.

VII. Party: Perennial

We arrive at the last of the movements forming the Qatari Suite, and remain on the theme of children which is so dear to Jandali; here, another traditional children’s song inspires the frenzied rhythms. ‘Al Aydo’ is sung to celebrate marriages and family unity. The hope and renewal represented by childhood – nature’s greatest miracle – is a powerful creative stimulus for Jandali.

VIII. Landscapes: Andantes

A musical landscape painting of Qatar, taking us from a gusty desert sunrise over the sand dunes, to the rain in the oasis, to the crystals that form the desert roses. The lower, murkier-textured segments relate specifically to a lagoon near the National Museum of Qatar, which features carvings in fountains inspired by Arabic script. As the music travels across the landscape and we encounter different sites and times of day, a rhythmic pattern continues to unfold: this ostinato suggests the continuity of time, constancy against change. Previously, unpredictable stabs of the xylophone suggested a dysfunctional clock: the long periods of time over which this landscape forms. These strokes become more regular, until a block of wood at the end taps steadily to suggest a ticking sound, as something recognizable forms: a reminder of the millennia it took to create the desert rose.

IX. The Desert Rose: Con moto

539 bars make up this final movement, representing the 539 interlocking discs that make up the National Museum of Qatar. As it should be for a symphony which is itself a variation on a natural and architectural phenomenon, Jandali concludes the work with a set of variations in the form of a passacaglia. The theme takes us back to the opening movement, closing the loop: back to nature and back to the land that created us.

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10 Best Quotes From House Of The Dragon Season 1 https://commonfolkusingcommonsense.com/10-best-quotes-from-house-of-the-dragon-season-1/ Mon, 24 Oct 2022 17:45:00 +0000 https://commonfolkusingcommonsense.com/10-best-quotes-from-house-of-the-dragon-season-1/ Dragon House hit the ground running. game of thrones captivated fans with its blistering pace and heavy themes. Dragon House had a similar effect, though it placed more emphasis on its political intrigue in the build-up to the civil war of Dance of the Dragons. RELATED: 10 Most Exciting Things About The House Of The […]]]>

Dragon House hit the ground running. game of thrones captivated fans with its blistering pace and heavy themes. Dragon House had a similar effect, though it placed more emphasis on its political intrigue in the build-up to the civil war of Dance of the Dragons.


RELATED: 10 Most Exciting Things About The House Of The Dragon Season 1 Finale

Dragon House is an adaptation of George RR Martin Fire & Blood but was driven by its outstanding performances and compelling characters. These characters produced memorable lines and quotes throughout the first season. They summed up specific moments perfectly, whether it was an opinion, a fact, or a statement of the utmost importance to the story.

Spoilers ahead for Dragon Housethe first season.

10/10 “The only thing that could tear down the dragon house was itself”

Rhaenyra Targaryen, Episode 1

Emma D’Arcy hasn’t officially joined the cast of Dragon House until after the time jump, but they provided the voiceover to kick off the show. As King Jaehaerys was shown announcing Viserys as his successor instead of Rhaenys, Rhaenyra’s words presented an ominous foreshadowing.

The Dance of the Dragons is a Targaryen civil war that Dragon House eventually heads towards. Jaehaerys’ words, spoken by Rhaenyra, started the show with the implication of a family ready to implode at any moment.

9/10 “Tongues will not change the succession, let them stir”

King Viserys Targaryen, Episode 1

When Rhaenys Targaryen Was Scorned In The Very First Episode Of Dragon House, Otto Hightower suggested to King Viserys that he might have Baratheon’s tongue for calling his cousin “The Queen Who Never Was”. Viserys’ dismissive response seemed to be fleeting and unimportant, but would resurface in a later episode.

After several time jumps, a frail and sickly Viserys would seek the tongues of anyone who questioned the legitimacy of the children of Rhaenyra. This then bled into the subject of who Driftmark’s rightful heir was, coming full circle to tie the tongues again without changing the succession. However, this time Viserys took the concept seriously.

8/10 “You may know what is the right thing to do, but love is still the hand. Love is a downfall. Best to make your way through life without a hitch”

Larys Strong, Episode 6

When he didn’t have much to contribute before Dragon House, Larys established himself as an irredeemable character in “The Princess and the Queen” when he showed his dangerous loyalty to Alicent Hightower. Larys even killed his own father and brother when Alicent simply stated that she wanted her father reinstated as Hand of the King.

RELATED: 10 Most Implausible House Of The Dragon Characters, Ranked

Along with the shock of Larys’ despicable actions, those words symbolized the collapse of House Targaryen’s love, which ultimately sparked the Dance of the Dragons. By killing his own family members, Larys showed his loyalty to Alicent, even though his true intentions were kept close to the chest.

7/10 “History does not remember blood, it remembers names”

Corlys Velaryon, Episode 7

Corlys Velaryon hasn’t been shy about showing her ambition throughout Dragon Housethe first season. He made several plays for power, most being rebuffed by Otto Hightower and Viserys Targaryen.

In Episode 7, “Driftmark”, Corlys discussed the future of House Velaryon with his wife Rhaenys, showing his determination to remain loyal to his grandchildren, despite their illegitimacy. Corlys had previously made a deal for the children of Rhaenyra and Laenor to bear the name Velaryon, which he considered to be more important than their true blood status.

6/10 “Do you know what color it shines when Oldtown calls its banners to war?”

Larys Strong, Episode 5

“We Light the Way” wasn’t just the last episode of Dragon House before the major time jump, but it also saw many of the first big steps towards the impending Dance of the Dragons. Alicent felt betrayed and alone, after being lied to by Rhaenyra, and she sought to make a statement. Alicent announced herself to Rhaenyra and Laenor’s wedding by arriving late wearing a green dress.

RELATED: House Of The Dragon: Young Alicent’s 10 Best Power Plays

This green robe was symbolic of House Hightower, with Larys and Harwin Strong immediately noticing it as a call to arms for those loyal to him. This is where war began to seem inevitable, as the simmering internal conflicts reached a boiling point.

5/10 “There is no power except what people allow you to take”

Mysaria, episode 9

“The Green Council” was an intense episode for everyone still at King’s Landing. Viserys’ death and Alicent’s interpretation of his last words sent the Small Council into a frenzy as they planned to place Aegon as their next ruler, instead of Rhaenyra.

Mysaria, once an ally of Daemon, returned in “The Green Council”, showcasing her established power and influence. She held the cards as the only one who knew Aegon’s whereabouts and made an ambitious plea for Otto to put an end to the child-fighting rings in the city. Mysaria’s words were stern as she warned Otto that ordinary people mattered more than he knew.

4/10 “To escape a storm, you can either navigate it or go around it. But you should never wait for it to come”

Corlys Velaryon, Episode 2

With House Velaryon commanding the seas, it’s no surprise that much of their wisdom is rooted in their maritime knowledge. In Episode 2, Corlys warned the Little Council that action needed to be taken against the Triarchy and their uprisings in the Stepstones.

Corlys was largely ignored but reaffirmed the need for her request, implying that the situation should not be allowed to escalate further. Laenor Velaryon later made another similar reference to the storm, stating “the wise sailor flees the storm as it gathers.” It was a fascinating follow-up quote to support his father while staying true to the nautical theme his family was famous for.

3/10 “You do not wish to be free, but to make a window in the wall of your prison”

Rhaenys Targaryen, Episode 9

“The Green Council” provided many intense moments after the death of Viserys Targaryen. However, the episode’s MVP was the late king’s cousin, Rhaenys Targaryen. Rhaenys was held prisoner at King’s Landing while arrangements were made to make Aegon the new king.

RELATED: 10 Ways Aegon II Is Even Worse Than Joffrey Or Ramsay

Alicent tried to rock Rhaenys to her side, but Rhaenys came back with cold beards, as she always did. Rhaenys was never shy about saying how it is, that’s what she did in this scene. She called Alicent for being trapped in a predicament she had created herself.

2/10 “We’re playing a lousy game. And now, for the first time, I see you have the determination to win it”

Otto Hightower, Episode 7

“Driftmark” continued the escalation of the family feuds in Dragon House with the aftermath of Aemond Targaryen claiming the mighty dragon Vhagar. Aemond was then confronted by the children of Daemon and Rhaenyra. Lucerys Velaryon even cut and gouged out one of Aemond’s eyes.

Chaos ensued when the families learned what had happened. Alicent demanded that Lucerys also lose an eye and tried to take it herself. While Alicent regretted her aggressive behavior, Otto liked her. Otto often tried to use his daughter as a chess piece to pursue his own ambitions, but it showed him fire and valor.

1/10 “The idea that we control the dragons is an illusion. They are a mighty man they should never have toyed with”

King Viserys, Episode 1

Dragon House gave fans more insight into the coexistence of man and dragon than they saw in game of thrones. There were several dragons left in the dragon dance, but the illusion that they were controlled by their dragon riders was completely removed in episode 10.

Aemond Targaryen pursued Lucerys Velaryon on dragonback with the childish intention of scaring him away, but Vhagar and Arrax acted alone. Luke’s inexperienced young dragon urged the gigantic Vhagar to retaliate, which she duly did. Aemond accidentally started the Dance of the Dragons reaffirming what his late father had said at the start of Dragon House.

NEXT: 10 Video Games To Play If You Like House Of The Dragon

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Rishi Sunak next or UK return to Boris Johnson? Here are the 4 suitors after the resignation of Liz Truss https://commonfolkusingcommonsense.com/rishi-sunak-next-or-uk-return-to-boris-johnson-here-are-the-4-suitors-after-the-resignation-of-liz-truss/ Fri, 21 Oct 2022 11:35:00 +0000 https://commonfolkusingcommonsense.com/rishi-sunak-next-or-uk-return-to-boris-johnson-here-are-the-4-suitors-after-the-resignation-of-liz-truss/ Boris Johnson served as prime minister for more than three years before stepping down just weeks ago. (Case) Even before Liz Truss stepped down, five names were floating around about who would come after her. Economic policies that had to be reversed, a series of resignations by ministers and aides and then the Conservative Party’s […]]]>

Boris Johnson served as prime minister for more than three years before stepping down just weeks ago. (Case)

Even before Liz Truss stepped down, five names were floating around about who would come after her. Economic policies that had to be reversed, a series of resignations by ministers and aides and then the Conservative Party’s loss of faith in her meant the announcement came as no surprise.

What may come as a surprise is that Boris Johnson, his outraged predecessor, is one of the names in the mix.

Leading UK news outlets – the Times, Daily Telegraph and BBC – have reports that he is in the running. The Times report cites sources as saying Boris Johnson believes it is a matter of “national interest” that he return to 10 Downing Street.

He’s not a favorite, however.

It is, unsurprisingly, Rishi Sunak.

Liz Truss, who remains caretaker, will end up with the shortest term as Prime Minister in Britain’s history.

Bookmakers’ favourite, former finance minister Sunak lost the race to Liz Truss just a few weeks ago.

After him come Penny Mordaunt and Defense Minister Ben Wallace, followed by Jeremy Hunt, the current Finance Minister. Mr Hunt has said he will not run, which puts former Prime Minister Boris Johnson fourth in the list of favourites.

The Conservatives – or Conservatives, as they are called – still have until December 2024 in power, that is, if they can find a prime minister who can stay on as president. The party will elect a new leader next week, until Liz Truss stays on as president.

Here are the likely contenders:

Rishi Sunak became Chancellor of the UK Treasury (Finance Minister, actually) just before the Covid pandemic hit in early 2020.

But his wealth meant people, even within the party, doubted he could understand the economic situation of choosing between heating himself or eating ordinary people.

A finance expert, the son of Indian-born parents who came to the UK from Africa decades ago, the millionaire is married to Indian tech heiress Akshaya Murty, whose father, NR Narayana Murthy, founded Infosys.

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Rishi Sunak and Penny Mordaunt, two main contenders for another PM race in Britain.

His alleged tax avoidance by using loopholes has also come into question. An MP since 2015, the 42-year-old resigned just before scandal-ridden Boris Johnson in July.

Rishi Sunak said in his resignation that the government should “be run properly, competently and earnestly”.

“I recognize that this may be my last ministerial post, but I believe these standards are worth upholding and that is why I am stepping down,” he wrote. He then came in and lost the race for the top job to Liz Truss.

Penny Mordauntcurrently Leader of the House of Commons, came third behind Liz Truss and Rishi Sunak in the Conservative Party leadership election.

After falling out of the race, she had supported Liz Truss. Recently, as Liz Truss’ star fell, Penny Mordaunt wrote a newspaper column saying “Britain needs stability, not a soap opera”.

The 49-year-old was once a reality TV star and is now the only woman in the running.

The BBC calls her “the Brexiteer who is popular with the grassroots”. She was a leading supporter of Britain leaving the European Union in a referendum in 2016.

Ben Wallace, 52, Defense Secretary under Boris Johnson and Liz Truss, was a bookies favorite when Mr Johnson quit. But he chose not to run.

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A former soldier, he said he wanted to focus on “the security of this great country”. He then endorsed Liz Truss.

Just two days ago he said he would quit if Liz Truss failed to deliver on her promise to spend 3% of UK GDP on defense by 2030.

Boris Johnsonthe ever colorful and often outrageous former mayor of London served more than three years as prime minister but had to step down after news of parties at his official home during the Covid lockdown surfaced.

That wasn’t the only scandal that led to his exit, however.

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Boris Johnson, educated in elite schools, has cultivated a humorous personality over the years.

His writings in the newspapers have often gotten him into trouble – allegations of racism come up repeatedly.

He’s been a senior Tory for more than two decades now, and backing Brexit is seen as his big moment of propelling him into serious politics.

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How Bob Dylan Used the Ancient Practice of “Imitation” to Create Some of the Most Original Songs of His Time https://commonfolkusingcommonsense.com/how-bob-dylan-used-the-ancient-practice-of-imitation-to-create-some-of-the-most-original-songs-of-his-time/ Wed, 19 Oct 2022 11:30:19 +0000 https://commonfolkusingcommonsense.com/how-bob-dylan-used-the-ancient-practice-of-imitation-to-create-some-of-the-most-original-songs-of-his-time/ by Raphael Falco, University of Maryland, Baltimore County [This article first appeared in The Conversation, republished with permission] Over six decades, Bob Dylan has consistently brought together popular music and poetic excellence. Yet the guardians of literary culture have rarely accepted Dylan’s legitimacy. His 2016 Nobel Prize in Literature undermined his underdog status, prompting scholars, […]]]>

by Raphael Falco, University of Maryland, Baltimore County [This article first appeared in The Conversation, republished with permission]

Over six decades, Bob Dylan has consistently brought together popular music and poetic excellence. Yet the guardians of literary culture have rarely accepted Dylan’s legitimacy.

His 2016 Nobel Prize in Literature undermined his underdog status, prompting scholars, fans and critics to regard Dylan as part of international literary heritage. My new book, “No One to Meet: Imitation and Originality in the Songs of Bob Dylan,” takes this challenge seriously and places Dylan in a literary tradition that stretches back to the ancients.

I am a professor of modern literature, with a particular interest in the Renaissance. But I’m also a longtime Dylan enthusiast and the co-editor of the open-access Dylan Review, the only scholarly journal on Bob Dylan.

After teaching and writing about modern poetry for 30 years, I couldn’t help but recognize a similarity between the way Dylan composes his songs and the ancient practice known as “imitatio.”

Poetic honey house

Although the Latin word imitatio would translate to “imitation” in English, it does not simply mean to produce a mirror image of something. Rather, the term describes a practice or methodology of composing poetry.

The classical author Seneca used bees as a metaphor for writing poetry using imitatio. Just as a bee collects and digests nectar from a whole field of flowers to produce a new type of honey – part flower, part bee – a poet produces a poem by taking and digesting the best authors of the past.

Dylan impersonations follow this pattern: His best work is always part flower, part Dylan.

Consider a song like “A Hard Rain’s A-Gonna Fall”. To write it, Dylan reused the familiar Old English ballad “Lord Randal”, retaining the call-and-response framework. In the original, a worried mother asks, “O where have you been, Lord Randal, my son? / And where were you, my handsome young man? and her son tells of being poisoned by his true love.

In Dylan’s version, the nominal son answers the same questions with a brilliant blend of public and private experiences, conjuring up violent images like a newborn baby surrounded by wolves, black branches dripping with blood, the broken tongues of a thousand speakers and pellets poisoning the water. At the end, a young girl hands a rainbow to the speaker – who has no son but the name – and he promises to know her song well before going up the mountain to sing it.

“A Hard Rain’s A-Gonna Fall” resonates with the original Old English ballad, which would have been very familiar to Dylan’s original audience of Greenwich Village folk singers. He first sang the song in 1962 at the Gaslight Cafe on MacDougal Street, a haunt of folk revival stalwarts. To their ears, Dylan’s indictment of American culture—its racism, militarism, and reckless destruction of the environment—would have echoed that poisoning in the earlier poem and added strength to the repurposed lyrics.

Draw from the source

Because Dylan “samples and digests” songs from the past, he was accused of plagiarism.

This accusation understates Dylan’s complex creative process, which closely resembles that of early modern poets who had a different concept of originality – a concept Dylan intuitively understands. For Renaissance writers, “originality” meant not creating something out of nothing, but returning to what had come before. They have literally returned to “the origin”. Writers first looked outside of themselves for patterns to imitate, then they transformed what they imitated – that is, what they found, sampled and digested – into something new. Achieving originality depended on the successful imitation and reorientation of an admired author from a much earlier era. They did not imitate each other, nor the contemporary authors of a different national tradition. Instead, they found their models among the authors and works of previous centuries.

In his book “The Light in Troy”, literary scholar Thomas Greene points to a 1513 letter written by the poet Pietro Bembo to Giovanfrancesco Pico della Mirandola.

“Imitation”, writes Bembo, “since it is entirely concerned with a model, must be drawn from the model…the activity of imitation is nothing but translating the resemblance of someone’s style another in his own writings.” The act of translation was largely stylistic and involved a transformation of the model.

The Romantics imagine a new definition of originality

However, the romantics of the late 18th century wished to change and supersede this understanding of poetic originality. For them, and for the writers who followed them, creative originality meant going within to find a connection with nature.

As romantic literature scholar MH Abrams explains in his renowned study “Natural Supernaturalism”, “the poet will proclaim how attuned an individual mind … is to the outer world, and the outer world to the mind, and how the two in union are able to engender a new world.

Instead of the world being forged by imitating the ancients, new romantic theories envisioned the union of nature and spirit as the ideal creative process. Abrams quotes the 18th century German Romantic Novalis: “Higher philosophy is concerned with the marriage of nature and spirit.

The Romantics believed that through this connection of nature and spirit, poets would discover something new and produce an original creation. Borrowing from past ‘original’ models, rather than producing a supposedly new work or ‘new world’, might seem like theft, despite the fact, obvious to anyone leafing through an anthology, that poets have always responded to each other and to the previous ones. works.

Unfortunately – as Dylan’s detractors too often demonstrate – this bias favoring supposedly “natural” originality over imitation continues to color visions of the creative process today.

For six decades now, Dylan has upended that romantic idea of ​​originality. With his own idiosyncratic method of songwriting and his creative reimagining of the Renaissance practice of imitatio, he has written and performed – yes, imitation works in performance too – over 600 songs, many of which are the most significant and original songs of His time.

For me, there is strong historical and theoretical justification for what these audiences have known for a long time – and the Nobel Prize committee made it official in 2016 – that Bob Dylan is both a very unique modern voice and, at the same time, the product of old, age-old ways of practicing and thinking about creativity.

Raphael Falco, English teacher, University of Maryland, Baltimore County

This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.

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THE SMOKING CORNER: THE POLITICS OF TRANSGRESSION – Journal https://commonfolkusingcommonsense.com/the-smoking-corner-the-politics-of-transgression-journal/ Sun, 16 Oct 2022 03:11:57 +0000 https://commonfolkusingcommonsense.com/the-smoking-corner-the-politics-of-transgression-journal/ Artwork by Abro Former Prime Minister Imran Khan is known for his remarks which are often castigated by his detractors for being uttered in bad taste. Not only does he issue explosive threats to police officers and judges, but he also has a habit of mocking his opponents with crude rhetoric and mannerisms bordering on […]]]>

Artwork by Abro

Former Prime Minister Imran Khan is known for his remarks which are often castigated by his detractors for being uttered in bad taste.

Not only does he issue explosive threats to police officers and judges, but he also has a habit of mocking his opponents with crude rhetoric and mannerisms bordering on misogyny, sexism and bigotry.

Former US President Donald Trump used similar “tactics”, as did Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro.

The other common point between the three men is that they are all considered populists.

According to their political agendas, populists mobilize existing prejudices in society, which encourages transgressive behaviors of their supporters

According to political scientist Pierre Ostiguy, populists rely on “doing what is culturally qualified as rude, ill-mannered and vulgar”. Compared to more traditional politicians, populists are willing to bring rhetoric that is generally considered unpalatable into the public sphere. They know there is an enthusiastic audience who will interpret it as ‘honesty’ and ‘simplicity’.

Mainstream political decorum tends to leave little room for the rude and rude. But populism disputes this. According to political scientist Cass Mudde, “populist leaders tend to use plain and even vulgar language.” What they do to disrupt the prevailing decorum and create space for themselves as the “voice of the people”. It is made with such audacity that opponents of populists are forced to aim for it. Populists appreciate the attention it brings.

For political scientist Maria Casullo, populists have an “antagonistic vision of society”. They see society as being at odds with an elite. Populists present themselves as champions of the malcontents. The articulation of this antagonistic vision is done in a performative way, through dramatic rhetoric, gesture and theatricality. It is a performance that shapes the political personality of the populist.

Imran Khan’s “performances” include rallies that have a live soundtrack interspersing his speeches with bits of songs and music, chosen to match his words. He mixes raw “humor”, grandiloquent claims and outbursts of anger to express his antagonistic vision. This has shaped a perception of him as a person who is an “outspoken speaker” and “young at heart”.

He also often quotes selected extracts from the Holy Scriptures of Islam. Frequently shown images of him praying and associating with Islamic evangelists broaden the perception. For his supporters, therefore, he is not only an “honest” man, but also a very spiritual one, chosen by fate as a savior.

Various political scientists and sociologists have often used the word “transgression” to explain the function of “bad language and bad manners” in a populist’s arsenal. This is one of the ways populists disrupt mainstream norms, because they believe these norms are the domain of elites with whom “ordinary people” cannot identify. It is a notion that populists convey and proliferate. Some even go so far as to justify their “vulgar” outbursts with the concept of “freedom of expression”.

Trump mocked people with physical disabilities. He broke the rules of a new norm in which the word ‘crippled’, for example, was replaced by more ‘respectable’ terms such as ‘disabled’, ‘visually impaired’, ‘hearing impaired’, etc. In Trump’s mind, the new terms were part of a liberal elite project to transform the way ordinary people spoke. For him, it was an ideological project aimed at burdening ordinary Americans with the guilt of being rude and politically incorrect.

Imran Khan often describes one of his enemies, Maryam Nawaz, as a ‘naani‘ [grandmother], even though she is 48 and Khan is 70. Indeed, she is a grandmother. But Khan portrays this fact in a rather misogynistic way, more than hinting that she is a naani who dresses fashionably and has undergone cosmetic surgery.

It is as if, for him, grandmothers, whatever their age, should be simple and modest and certainly not in politics. He, on the other hand, can be 70, married three times, and doing everything he can to look like the handsome kid he was decades ago. The “beau gosse” track is essential to its performative populist appeal.

Speaking as he does of Maryam, Khan challenges the idea that women don’t need to start looking “old” as soon as they become mothers or grandmothers. He does this by reinforcing the caricature of grandmothers with white hair and few teeth. In her mind, this is how “ordinary people” imagine grandmothers (and so, so should it be). Therefore, the opposite and more evolved view in this regard becomes a “Westernized” construction that must be denied.

But what is the impact of transgressive rhetoric beyond instant applause and excitement among populist supporters? A May 2019 study, published in The European Journal of Policy Research, posits that populists mobilize existing prejudices and divisions in a society. They undermine the idea of ​​solving them by more democratic and consensual means and, on the contrary, encourage direct action. The opposing party is demonized and dehumanized so that their misfortunes can be celebrated and mocked without any guilt.

This is why physical attacks on minority groups in the United States have increased during the Trump presidency, as have attacks on Muslims in Narendra Modi’s India. Existing prejudices have been mobilized by Trump and Modi. Khan, on the other hand, intensified his opponents’ perceptions of being “corrupt” and then mobilized those perceptions. This results in frequent transgressive behavior from his supporters on social media as well as in the physical spaces where his opponents are present.

Two years ago, a good friend of mine, who is from Charsadda in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, told me about an elderly relative who was very concerned about Khan’s impact on young Pakhtuns. The relative lamented that the young men had lost all respect for opposing views and were prepared to physically attack anyone who disagreed with them. He added that a young man wouldn’t even hesitate to slap his own father if he found him disagreeable.

The most disconcerting part of the story was that the parent feared that even if Khan were to be ousted from politics, the transgressive behavior that his rhetoric normalized would persist and could eventually find a new outlet for young people in militant organizations. .

For the loved one, the damage was already done.

Posted in Dawn, EOS, October 16, 2022

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