Charles baudelaire – Commonfolk Using Common Sense http://commonfolkusingcommonsense.com/ Tue, 13 Sep 2022 16:56:11 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://commonfolkusingcommonsense.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-99.png Charles baudelaire – Commonfolk Using Common Sense http://commonfolkusingcommonsense.com/ 32 32 What would Susan Sontag say? • Fred Ritchin https://commonfolkusingcommonsense.com/what-would-susan-sontag-say-fred-ritchin/ Mon, 12 Sep 2022 19:43:48 +0000 https://commonfolkusingcommonsense.com/what-would-susan-sontag-say-fred-ritchin/ Moreover, Benjamin’s concept of the “aura of the original” becomes anachronistic when the copy of an image becomes indistinguishable from its source, as is the case today in the digital age. Given the current plethora of images, it can also be argued that the “aura” of not only the image but what it represents is […]]]>

Moreover, Benjamin’s concept of the “aura of the original” becomes anachronistic when the copy of an image becomes indistinguishable from its source, as is the case today in the digital age. Given the current plethora of images, it can also be argued that the “aura” of not only the image but what it represents is largely erased, sometimes transformed into “branding”. And as synthetic images that look like photographs but don’t require a camera are made in greater numbers via artificial intelligence systems, the photograph’s witness function will most likely deteriorate further.

As a result, iconic photographs rarely exist today, with few images able to emerge from the billions produced that command societal attention, as was the case in the last century when newspapers and magazines could highlight certain photographs. on the printed page, lending them their journalistic authority. The advent of social media has transformed almost every photograph into an opinion that can be refuted, rather than a referent establishing the visible facts of a situation.

This break requires our attention. For example, reminiscent of photography’s earlier ability to establish what happened elsewhere, many in the United States are calling for the publication of photographs showing the pulverized bodies of young schoolchildren killed by gunmen with quality assault rifles. military. They argue it will bring society back to its senses and lead to more rational gun laws. Their arguments often refer to other such images, including those published in 1955 of the body of 14-year-old Emmett Till, photographed after being beaten and lynched by American racists, or the 1972 photograph of Kim Phuc, 9 years old, burning with napalm. in Vietnam, both of which are considered powerful stimulators of societal change.

In 1945, before these two photographs were published, Susan Sontag commented on her own experience of. viewing photographs of the Bergen-Belsen and Dachau concentration camps for the first time: “Nothing I have seen – in photography or in real life – has ever touched me so clearly, deeply, instantly. Indeed, it seems plausible to divide my life into two parts, before seeing these photographs (I was twelve years old) and after, although it took several years before I fully understood what it was about.

More than seventy-five years ago, Sontag and many others could be moved by the photographs of those who are suffering, dead and dying. But today, immersed in a torrent of images with other media, the relationship with photographs is markedly different, so what Susan Sontag explored in her seminal book, On the photoseems in many ways essential to describe an earlier medium, which remains largely in our rear view mirrors.

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An AI-generated image won an art award. The artists are not happy. https://commonfolkusingcommonsense.com/an-ai-generated-image-won-an-art-award-the-artists-are-not-happy/ Sat, 10 Sep 2022 00:00:00 +0000 https://commonfolkusingcommonsense.com/an-ai-generated-image-won-an-art-award-the-artists-are-not-happy/ NEW YORK — This year, the Colorado State Fair’s annual art competition awarded prizes in all the usual categories: painting, quilt, sculpture. But one participant, Mr. Jason M. Allen of Pueblo West, Colorado, did not enter with a brush or a piece of clay. He created it with Midjourney, an artificial intelligence program that turns […]]]>

NEW YORK — This year, the Colorado State Fair’s annual art competition awarded prizes in all the usual categories: painting, quilt, sculpture.

But one participant, Mr. Jason M. Allen of Pueblo West, Colorado, did not enter with a brush or a piece of clay. He created it with Midjourney, an artificial intelligence program that turns lines of text into hyperrealistic graphics.

Mr Allen’s work ‘Space Opera Theatre’ won the blue ribbon in the fair’s competition for emerging digital artists – making it one of the first AI-generated pieces to win a prize. such a price and triggering a fierce reaction from the artists who essentially accused him of cheating.

Reached by telephone on Wednesday August 31, Mr. Allen defended his work. He said he clarified that his work – which was submitted as “Jason M. Allen via Midjourney” – was created using AI and that he did not deceive anyone about his origins.

“I’m not going to apologize for that,” he said. “I won and didn’t break any rules.”

AI-generated art has been around for years. But the tools released this year – with names like DALL-E 2, Midjourney and Stable Diffusion – allowed high-level hobbyists to create intricate, abstract or photorealistic works simply by typing a few words into a text box.

These apps have made many human artists anxious about their own future; why would anyone pay for art, they wonder, when they could produce it themselves? They have also sparked fierce debates about the ethics of AI-generated art and opposition from people who claim these apps are essentially a form of high-tech plagiarism.

Mr Allen, 39, started experimenting with AI-generated art this year. He runs a studio, Incarnate Games, which makes tabletop games, and he was curious how the next generation of AI image generators would compare to the human artists whose works he commissioned.

This summer, he was invited to a Discord chat server where people were testing out Midjourney, which uses a complex process called “broadcasting” to turn text into personalized images. Users type a series of words into a message to Midjourney; the bot spits out an image a few seconds later.

Mr. Allen became obsessed, creating hundreds of images and marveling at their realism. Whatever he was typing, Midjourney seemed capable of doing it.

“I couldn’t believe what I was seeing,” he said. “I felt like it was demonically inspired – like an otherworldly force was involved.”

Eventually Mr. Allen had the idea to submit one of his Midjourney creations to the Colorado State Fair, which had a division for “digital art/digitally manipulated photography”. He had a local store print the image on canvas and submitted it to the judges.

“The fair was coming up,” he said, “and I thought, how wonderful would it be to show people how great this art is?”

Several weeks later, while walking around the Pueblo Fairgrounds, Allen saw a blue ribbon hanging next to his piece. He had won the division, along with a prize of US$300 (S$422).

“I couldn’t believe it,” he said. “I felt like that was exactly what I wanted to accomplish.”

(Mr Allen declined to share the exact text he submitted to Midjourney to create “Théâtre D’Opéra Spatial”. But he said the French translation – “Space Opera Theatre” – provided a clue.)

Following his victory, Mr Allen posted a photo of his award-winning work on the Midjourney Discord chat. It made its way to Twitter, where it sparked a furious backlash.

“We watch the death of art unfold before our eyes,” one Twitter user wrote.

“This is so disgusting,” wrote another. “I can see how AI art can be beneficial, but pretending you’re an artist by generating one? Absolutely not.”

Some artists have defended Mr Allen, saying that using AI to create a piece is no different from using Photoshop or other digital image manipulation tools and that human creativity is always needed to find the right prompts to generate an award-winning piece.

Mr. Olga Robak, spokeswoman for the Colorado Department of Agriculture, which oversees the state fair, said Allen sufficiently disclosed Midjourney’s involvement when submitting his article; the category’s rules allow for any “artistic practice that uses digital technology as part of the creative or presentation process.” The two category judges didn’t know Midjourney was an AI program, she said, but both told her afterwards that they would have awarded Allen the top prize even if they had. do.

The controversy over new technologies for artistic creation is nothing new. Many painters recoiled from the invention of the camera, which they saw as a debasement of human art. (Charles Baudelaire, a 19th-century French poet and art critic, called photography “art’s deadliest enemy.”) In the 20th century, digital editing tools and computer-aided design programs computer have also been rejected by purists for requiring too little skill on their part. human collaborators.

According to some reviewers, what makes the new generation of AI tools different isn’t just that they’re able to produce beautiful works of art with minimal effort. That’s how they work. Applications like DALL-E 2 and Midjourney are created by fetching millions of images from the open web, then teaching algorithms to recognize patterns and relationships in those images and generate new ones in the same style. This means that artists who upload their works to the Internet can unwittingly help train their algorithmic competitors.

“What makes this AI different is that it’s explicitly trained on artists who are currently working,” RJ Palmer, a digital artist, tweeted last month. “This thing wants our jobs, it’s actively anti-artist.”

Even those impressed with AI-generated art worry about how it’s made. Mr. Andy Baio, a technologist and writer, wrote in a recent essay that DALL-E 2, perhaps the hottest AI image generator on the market, was “bordering on magic in which he is able to ward off, but raises so many ethical questions, it’s hard to keep track of them all.

Mr Allen, the Blue Ribbon winner, said he sympathized with artists who feared AI tools would put them out of work. But he said their anger should not be directed at people who use DALL-E 2 or Midjourney to make art, but at companies that choose to replace human artists with AI tools.

“It shouldn’t be an indictment of the technology itself,” he said. “The ethics are not in the technology. It’s in the people.

And he urged artists to overcome their objections to AI, if only as a coping strategy.

“It’s not going to stop,” Mr Allen said. “Art is dead, man. It’s over. AI won. Humans lost.

This article originally appeared in The New York Times.

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5 Things To Do At Portland Area Breweries This Fall Besides Drinking https://commonfolkusingcommonsense.com/5-things-to-do-at-portland-area-breweries-this-fall-besides-drinking/ Wed, 07 Sep 2022 15:57:34 +0000 https://commonfolkusingcommonsense.com/5-things-to-do-at-portland-area-breweries-this-fall-besides-drinking/ PORTLAND, Maine — French poet Charles Baudelaire said it best. “You always have to be drunk. It’s all that matters; it is our only imperative need”, he wrote at the beginning of the 19th century. Baudelaire wasn’t just talking about alcohol, though. “But with what? With wine, poetry or virtue, as desired. But do you […]]]>

PORTLAND, Maine — French poet Charles Baudelaire said it best.

“You always have to be drunk. It’s all that matters; it is our only imperative need”, he wrote at the beginning of the 19th century.

Baudelaire wasn’t just talking about alcohol, though.

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Are the Mann Law and the Rico Laws unconstitutional? https://commonfolkusingcommonsense.com/are-the-mann-law-and-the-rico-laws-unconstitutional/ Mon, 05 Sep 2022 09:39:00 +0000 https://commonfolkusingcommonsense.com/are-the-mann-law-and-the-rico-laws-unconstitutional/ Tom Coates unconstitutional Is money worth more than freedom, and is it wrong to want freedom, or is the pursuit of happiness earned by the suffering of others? An unconstitutional “law” is no law at all! (Michael Boldin) By: Andrew Collyer of Krsts Kemetian Church “As a result, the law was misused and often incorrectly […]]]>

Tom Coates unconstitutional

Is money worth more than freedom, and is it wrong to want freedom, or is the pursuit of happiness earned by the suffering of others?

An unconstitutional “law” is no law at all! (Michael Boldin) By: Andrew Collyer of Krsts Kemetian Church

“As a result, the law was misused and often incorrectly applied when it was first passed.” – Matthew Scottney, Vericia Miller

The Mann Act, also known as the White Woman Traffic Act of 1910, is a federal law that criminalizes the transportation of any woman for the purpose of sex work or for purposes considered immoral. In Caminetti v. United States in 1917; this law was used because the couple under investigation were married and both the husband and his married friend had had sex with other women. The two California residents were tried and found guilty. The United States Supreme Court has responded that fornication, even when approved by both parties involved, is considered immoral by their standards of law. If the wife has given permission for the immoral behavior; it is possible that she will also be charged with a crime. The Mann Act was not well known, but it was common for unethical sexual behavior, and therefore federal prosecutors could use this law on anyone they felt threatened by. But the 1978 amendment states “any sexual activity for which any person may be charged with a criminal offence”. On July 21, 1931, a well-known starlet named Louise Rolfe McGurn was charged and convicted of breaking the Mann Law. The couple involved claimed they got married while on a trip to Florida, but they weren’t officially. Jack McGurn was transported to serve his sentence at the federal prison in Leavenworth, Kansas. Was the Mann Act chosen to protect or destroy American lives? Is the Mann Act inhumane and unconstitutional? The Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act became law in 1970. In its guidelines, 20 years is required as the maximum sentence and a fine of $250,000. But for crimes related to drugs or homicide; the penalty could be life imprisonment. According to William L. Anderson and Candice E. Jackson of The Independent Review, this law has gone beyond its original intent, and now federal prosecutors are using it as a weapon against most established businesses. Is Rico’s Law Unethical, Torturing, and Unconstitutional?

“RICO claims have become so common (due to the triple damages clause) that most federal district courts now require you to complete a form explaining who the conspiracy is, which is typically lacking in a RICO claim. because technically a company can’t conspire with its employees, etc. You actually have to explain the conspiracy and if you can’t, your RICO claims are dismissed.- Steven Haddock 25 years litigation and administrative law.

For more information:

https://www.independent.org/publications/tir/article.asp?id=215

http://vimeo.com/744788288

http://www.kemetianchurchofkrsts.net/

https://www.amazon.com/s?k=kemetian+church+of+krsts&crid=29JK4V0GIVDKD&sprefix=Kemetian+Church%2Caps%2C384&ref=nb_sb_ss_ts-doa-p_1_15

Krsts Kemetian Church
1515 South Extension Road
Office 2140
Phoenix, Arizona 85210
Ajabel Manuelle

A holy spiritual church whose mission is to teach divine love, divine truth, peace and happiness. Divine love saves. Peace brings hope. Happiness lies in a spirit of peace.

This press release was published on openPR.

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Protests erupt in the streets as the high-end surf magazine teams up with the canvas shoe juggernaut to roll back equality, invite only half the number of women as men to ‘reinvent “Pipeline Masters! https://commonfolkusingcommonsense.com/protests-erupt-in-the-streets-as-the-high-end-surf-magazine-teams-up-with-the-canvas-shoe-juggernaut-to-roll-back-equality-invite-only-half-the-number-of-women-as-men-to-reinvent-pipeline-masters/ Wed, 31 Aug 2022 15:45:29 +0000 https://commonfolkusingcommonsense.com/protests-erupt-in-the-streets-as-the-high-end-surf-magazine-teams-up-with-the-canvas-shoe-juggernaut-to-roll-back-equality-invite-only-half-the-number-of-women-as-men-to-reinvent-pipeline-masters/ Surfing in the crosshairs of the war of the sexes after the mag collaborated with the star of “10 man cum slam” “Daddy it hurts II” and “Can she take it?” Riptide Bodyboarding Magazine was established in 1989 by Morrison Media on the Gold Coast at the height of the boogie boom. His target demographic […]]]>

Surfing in the crosshairs of the war of the sexes after the mag collaborated with the star of “10 man cum slam” “Daddy it hurts II” and “Can she take it?”

Riptide Bodyboarding Magazine was established in 1989 by Morrison Media on the Gold Coast at the height of the boogie boom. His target demographic then was a majority of barely post-pubescent boys who had just started the sport.

As its readership has matured, so has its content.

As the world passed the year 2000 CE, thoughtful articles and insightful interviews became its standard fare before the great publishing slump put it to sleep in the early 10s.

And so, it was asleep, inert, and inactive until earlier this year when a few crypto kids accessed their digital wallets and declared that “Boogen” was back and Riptide’s rival was on the way.

Channeling some good-time “Yer the Boyz” energy, the new Riptide looks poised to return to the heyday of its potential readers in both content and tone.

As a nod to his newly minted nihilistic image, it seems the idea of ​​shelling out $390 for a video message from male porn star Johnny Sins via celebrity content website “Cameo” has gotten the nod. green light as a witty and wacky way to promote an upcoming movie release. financed by the site.

Mr. Sins, real name Steven Wolfe, is a muscular, bald, alpha male who has starred in numerous porn movies, having been in the jizz biz for over ten years.

On the surface, the star’s selection of “10 man cum slam” “Daddy it hurts II” and “Can she take it?” is apparently an odd choice to ask to voice a clip of 20-something male bodyboarders based in Western Australia. Unless one takes into account the target audience, the Rippies boys tried to titillate with his appearance.

In the video message, Mr Sins encouraged runners to,

“Rip the waves like I tear the pussy”.

Harmless? Salacious? Problem?

UK-based surfer, cold-water swimmer and podcaster Sophie Hellyer certainly believed in later. She posted a thirty-second trailer to her 44,000 Instagram followers, decrying the connection between the use of such violent language directed at women’s reproductive organs and wave surfing.

Hellyer also detailed the shockingly high incidences of violence directed at women in porn movies, and how the normalization and emulation of on-screen sexual violence leads to the perpetuation of violence against women in the real world. .

Sophie’s followers stormed the comments section of Riptide’s Johnny Sins post.

Riptide responded by deleting it.

In return, Sophie received a stream of presumably nasty messages from bodyboarders with butt injuries.

Now, before we start our race to the bottom of victimization with banal assertions of “It’s just words” and “Everything’s too PC these days”, (usually uttered by horrible people who want to be able to say things horrible) recognize that language and representation matter.

A lot.

It’s a truth that should be obvious to generations of boogers raised under the constant barrage of derisive nicknames such as “Dick dragger, speed bumps, cripples and so on.”

If you are a bodyboarder who has experienced even a little of this humiliation, you will remember the shame, anger and resentment that simmers from falling less than others through the use of words .

Boogers were also the victims of acts of physical violence that were unleashed, often unprovoked, as violence against bodyboarders had been normalized in surf culture through talk in the surf media, especially in the 1980s and 90.

Experiencing degradation and violence, even a little, is healing and life changing. Words beget actions that have consequences. If any surfing community should understand this, it’s the Bodyboarders.

Participation rates in women’s sports have exploded exponentially in this century. In the world of surfing, women are taking to the waves like never before. The inclusive nature of the Longboarding/hipster movement provides women with a sense of identity and a sense of belonging to the line they have flocked to.

In women’s shortboard surfing, the establishment of equal professional contest prizes, the active promotion of star female surfers, and an encouraging culture that supports female surfers has resulted in a generational shift in participation rates and performance levels.

Both of these hobbies are thriving thanks to the inclusion and participation of women.

Wives and daughters see Belinda Baggs gliding gracefully over the waves or Caroline Marks executing high performance turns and the respect and admiration they receive for their skill.

Bodyboarding now they see a male pornstar encouraging someone to rip her pussy off.

In the early 90s, at the height of the boogin’/surfer war and the teen appeal phase, Riptide put a photo of booger Vicki Gleeson on the cover of the magazine, perhaps the first publication of surfing to do, certainly the first in Bodyboarding.

In the wake of this picture came a generation of Australian girls which included Kira Llewellyn, Mandy Zeiren, Lilly Pollard and others who raised the profile of women’s bodyboarding in Australia. Women’s bodyboarding remains a strong presence in Brazil, Japan and Hawaii due to established cultures of female rider inclusion and representation.

Bodyboarding should be the most accessible and popular surfing hobby for women. The equipment is cheap, safe and easily transportable. It’s easy to learn the basics and caters to all ability levels.

It’s time for the bodyboarding community to have candid and honest discussions about how the sport is presented to potential female participants and what the barriers are to their engagement.

If we don’t, we are essentially agreeing to exclude and dismiss women from sport, a move that would directly oppose larger societal trends that are empowering women around the world.

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Diamanda Galàs is a bizarre and very charismatic presence in Broken Gargoyles – album review https://commonfolkusingcommonsense.com/diamanda-galas-is-a-bizarre-and-very-charismatic-presence-in-broken-gargoyles-album-review/ Fri, 26 Aug 2022 07:00:08 +0000 https://commonfolkusingcommonsense.com/diamanda-galas-is-a-bizarre-and-very-charismatic-presence-in-broken-gargoyles-album-review/ If Muse treats apocalypticism like a roller coaster ride, then for Diamanda Galàs it’s no game. Since her recording debut 40 years ago, the American experimenter has amassed a tremendous body of work that deals with like an abject pit of despair. The texts are taken from the works of writers obsessed with death such […]]]>

If Muse treats apocalypticism like a roller coaster ride, then for Diamanda Galàs it’s no game. Since her recording debut 40 years ago, the American experimenter has amassed a tremendous body of work that deals with like an abject pit of despair. The texts are taken from the works of writers obsessed with death such as Charles Baudelaire. The subject includes psychosis, torture and illness, sung by Galàs with a clashing array of grunts, hisses, soprano notes and blackboard screams: an anti-aria for the end of the world.

His new album Broken Gargoyles deals with the sad subject of the maimed soldiers of the First World War, with lyrics taken from poems by the German Expressionist poet George Heym, a disciple of Baudelaire. It was born from an audiovisual installation produced in collaboration with the sound artist Daniel Neumann. There are two long titles, “Mutilatus” and “Abiectio”. This prodigious pair of tracks opens an eerily creaky door to the musical equivalent of an art house horror film.

His star is Galàs. At 66, she remains a very charismatic, if bizarre, presence on the mic. She recites Heym’s verses in a guttural, declamatory manner, as if the words were pieces of meat presented at a ceremonial feast. Even if you don’t understand German, you feel their physical strength like sound objects. Sometimes the electronic distortion gives her the demonic quality of a death metal singer. Elsewhere, she sings high-pitched, multi-track harmonies like a hellish choir or sags in unintelligible noise – a communicative breakdown.

The music scrolls like a cursed landscape. Low piano chords on the left side of the keyboard are struck with resounding accentuation. Electronic sounds clack and roar in the background. Every now and then the bright tone of a bell rings out, an effect borrowed from psychedelic music. There, it means a moment of higher consciousness. Here he opens our minds to the depths, a disconcerting but necessary act of calculation.

★★★★☆

Broken Gargoyles‘ is published by Intravenal Sound Operations

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Mick Jagger of the Rolling Stones once said Sympathy for the Devil was “kind of a Bob Dylan song” https://commonfolkusingcommonsense.com/mick-jagger-of-the-rolling-stones-once-said-sympathy-for-the-devil-was-kind-of-a-bob-dylan-song/ Thu, 25 Aug 2022 10:15:22 +0000 https://commonfolkusingcommonsense.com/mick-jagger-of-the-rolling-stones-once-said-sympathy-for-the-devil-was-kind-of-a-bob-dylan-song/ You can’t tell the story of classic rock without the Rolling Stones. And you can’t tell the band’s story without talking about the song “Sympathy for the Devil.” Mick Jagger once said the song was powerful because of its mid-tempo groove, and he also described it as something close to what Bob Dylan could do, […]]]>

You can’t tell the story of classic rock without the Rolling Stones. And you can’t tell the band’s story without talking about the song “Sympathy for the Devil.” Mick Jagger once said the song was powerful because of its mid-tempo groove, and he also described it as something close to what Bob Dylan could do, and he’s not too far off.

Mick Jagger (left) and Keith Richards (right) during the recording of the Rolling Stones song ‘Sympathy for the Devil’ | Keystone Features/Getty Images

Mick Jagger once said that “Sympathy for the Devil” was “a kind of Bob Dylan song”

Jagger once told Rolling Stone magazine that the works of French poet Charles Baudelaire influenced him when he wrote “Sympathy for the Devil”, by Far magazine. Jagger then compared the song to Bob Dylan, another music legend who made a name for himself in the 1960s.

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Canvas Book Wrap: Jumping Sundays by Nick Bollinger and a Conversation with Kiran Dass https://commonfolkusingcommonsense.com/canvas-book-wrap-jumping-sundays-by-nick-bollinger-and-a-conversation-with-kiran-dass/ Fri, 19 Aug 2022 18:00:00 +0000 https://commonfolkusingcommonsense.com/canvas-book-wrap-jumping-sundays-by-nick-bollinger-and-a-conversation-with-kiran-dass/ Papanui High School students protest the long hair ban, February 1971. Photo / Christchurch City Libraries What does hair have to do with it? Many, in the counterculture movement of the 1960s. “What a frightening threat to humanity is posed by the culture of long hair, which the defenders of the law and the guardians […]]]>

Papanui High School students protest the long hair ban, February 1971. Photo / Christchurch City Libraries

What does hair have to do with it? Many, in the counterculture movement of the 1960s. “What a frightening threat to humanity is posed by the culture of long hair, which the defenders of the law and the guardians

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“Untouchable, disappointing, infinitely changeable.” A Playlist of Not-So-Main Characters ‹ Literary Center https://commonfolkusingcommonsense.com/untouchable-disappointing-infinitely-changeable-a-playlist-of-not-so-main-characters-literary-center/ Tue, 16 Aug 2022 08:59:18 +0000 https://commonfolkusingcommonsense.com/untouchable-disappointing-infinitely-changeable-a-playlist-of-not-so-main-characters-literary-center/ A sinful reading admission: I like characters that aren’t well balanced and protagonists that have a difficult relationship with being main. It is a relief to meet them. Have you ever felt like a not so complete, unreal, insubstantial person compared to others? I’m not talking about insecurity or impostor syndrome so much as about […]]]>

A sinful reading admission: I like characters that aren’t well balanced and protagonists that have a difficult relationship with being main. It is a relief to meet them. Have you ever felt like a not so complete, unreal, insubstantial person compared to others? I’m not talking about insecurity or impostor syndrome so much as about the frayed, feverish experience of dissociation, the feeling that your past and present are not consistent with true personality.

Elena Ferrante’s term for this is frantumaille, a word from his mother’s dialect that inscribes the self as a jumble of fragments; to discover frantumaille is to be an “unstable landscape”, plagued by contradictory sensations that threaten to tear you apart. Ferrante writes that this inherited dissociative state is directly related to the ability to speak as oneself: that I had learned to control, from the first year of life until now, would begin to fluctuate on its own, dripping or hissing from a body becoming a thing, a leather bag letting out air and liquids.

Meet people with frantumaille in fiction does not guarantee pleasant reading. A warm, palpable sense of self does not escape the page to greet you, like a friend or a familiar scent. These characters can seem underdeveloped, cold, aloof, not fully fleshed out, unable to offer the reader a straightforward account of themselves. They could be described as unreliable, complex, neurotic, frustrating, unpleasant. They are often, but not exclusively, poor, neurodivergent, gay, women, people of color. They have often, but not necessarily, experienced trauma. Some might try to dissociate themselves from their own storylines. Their inconsistency is not the result of bad writing, but because they exist in a troubled relationship with what it means to feel real – to carefully piece together a mess of thoughts, feelings and experiences under the banner of an “I”, with all the assurance that implies.

Why read or even write characters like this? There’s good old identification, of course, and I’d like to think that complicates empathy’s overreliance on articulation. It’s easier to understand someone when they, like a “good” main character, take you through their past and connect the dots in the present. But not everyone can give a full account of themselves.

And sometimes the attempt to do so can lock the speaker into certain narrative positions that others expect of them; the “I” calcifies around its particularities or its experience of evil and excludes the possibility of existing otherwise. Not-so-main characters hold space for not having, or not being able to, divulge the worst things that have happened to you in order to deserve to take up space. During and after trying to write a narrator like this in my own novel, the following works of fiction, poetry, and theory have been indispensable to me. They provided a framework for designing a first person that always wiggles uncomfortably out of its pronoun, both more and less than the undisclosed sum of its parts.

*

Marie Ndiaye, Self-Portrait in Green

This novel not only seems to change every time I come back to it, but also to change form during the act of reading. A grown woman with young children, the narrator is both detached and keenly connected to her surroundings, even more so when she encounters one of the “women in green” who haunt her past, present and future. Women in green are a slippery, diffuse category – beautiful, glamorous, dangerous – which the narrator is both frightened and bewitched by.

At one point, her mother transforms into the archetypal woman in green: “untouchable, disappointing, infinitely mutable”, but the narrator finds these figures more substantial than herself, and it is only her observations that give a negative definition to his own interiority: “they decorate my thoughts, my invisible life.” As the narrator realizes that she needs the women in green to be coherent and find life bearable, she reveals her own spectrality as a means of coping with the loss.

Sarah Bernstein, The bad days ahead

There is something of a “woman in green” about Clara, a colleague who catches the eye of The bad days ahead anonymous narrator. Where Clara is enigmatic and confident, the narrator is indistinct, living on the fringes of her own life. Her concern for Clara creates a centripetal effect that confirms her own existence: “I felt that Clara realized the things I said, that my thoughts were admitted into the sensory universe. Like NDiaye, Bernstein brilliantly captures the tension between detachment and encounter, of a distorted attachment to the world.

We know little about the story of the narrator except through a drip of disturbing and rambling anecdotes. At one point, she receives an email from her father informing her of her mother’s suicide, quickly followed by an automated message stating that the sender’s email address does not exist. This kind of thwarted movement toward intimacy and connection is at the heart of The bad days ahead. One of the things I like most about this book is its examination of the gradations of detachment, both before and after the experience of violent acts.

Nuar Alsadir, fourth person singular

By writing the fragments that make up part of fourth person singular, Nuar Alsadir – also a practicing psychoanalyst – has found a method to capture the material that usually falls through the net of the conscious mind. She set an alarm for the early morning hours and wrote down everything that came through the pen in her hand as she woke from sleep. In this hypnogogic state, the “I” of the waking mind is still cloudy, blurred by the content of the dreams. The result is a constellation of gem-like statements that seem both elusive and a direct line to a seemingly personal, otherwise obscured truth: “Gotta tidy up, sentiment – ​​fast!” I drop it in the little pocket, lock it up.

Also including essays that revolve around subjects of shame and the lyric “I”, fourth person singular delights in contradiction and multiplicity, in parts that do not form a whole. It reminds me that a literary “I” can “resist adopting fiction in a singular voice, have the intimate quality of a notebook without the intimate content, become the position or spokesperson through which the world, rather than an individual, speak”.

Denise Riley, The words of oneself: identification, solidarity, irony

The second chapter of words of self begins with an author’s admission: “I have long nurtured the suspicion of a certain guilt, associated both with the writing and with the acceptance of an identification, itself partly generated and fueled by the language functioning. This guilt is the “linguistic malaise” generated by the attempt to speak or write as oneself, which has as much (if not more) to do with the language as with the person speaking. And why wouldn’t it be, when the grammar on which we rely to reference ourselves “seems to require, even guarantee, an authenticity closely linked to originality”. It’s a productively sticky situation when the first person pronoun designated to say our own uniqueness is also everyone else’s. As Riley succinctly puts it: “Anyone else is as I and although calling me II don’t mind saying me, this one person, what I’m saying is all the same something quite universal.

Ingeborg Bachman, Malina

There was a time in 2020 when everyone on my social media feeds (including me) seemed to either be reading Malina or watch the 1991 film adaptation, scripted by Elfriede Jelinek and starring Isabelle Huppert as the anonymous narrator. I understand: it was confinement, and Malina largely consists of a woman unraveling in her apartment, referencing a mysterious virus that seems to encompass love, language, fascism and patriarchy. This virus is similar to what Hélène Cixous called wolf loveand maybe sitting next to Lauren Berlant cruel optimism—an attachment, sometimes fatal, to what harms you. Infected by this virus, the narrator lives with a man – Malina – and is in love with another – Ivan – who lives nearby.

What begins as an almost simple story of romantic obsession quickly implodes narratively and linguistically, when the narrator realizes that, as Rachel Kushner’s introduction puts it, “she operates in a field of signs, a reality whole sensory, which is masculine. Or, according to the photo I captured from the film (which, of course, was the one everyone else captured as well): “Language is punishment. All things are inside.

Simone Weill, gravity and grace

gravity and grace is a collection of diary entries by French Catholic mystic and political activist Simone Weil, compiled after her death. The book is duly heterogeneous, exploring topics such as evil, beauty, and algebra, and several chapters devoted to the self and its destruction—or what Weil calls “decreation.” Decreation consists of an avowal that “We possess nothing in the world […] except the power to say “I”…” and that our “I” is “…what we have to give to God, in other words, destroy. »

For Weil, the “I” is a coagulation of the past and the future, an arbitrary mask from which one must learn to detach in order to be filled with God. The writing is elliptical in tone, consistent with an internal logic that is not immediately graspable; Again gravity and grace is a book I usually come back to, less for theological instruction than for its detachment from the existence of the ego, complicating the ease with which a self can tell its own story: “I am also other than what I am. imagine being. ‘Cause I’m a bad reader, I can’t stop reading G&G alongside the odd details of Weil’s Biography; it is infinitely compelling to me that a person who seemed such a distinctive individual was so preoccupied with the metaphysical and political task of undoing himself.

Lisa Robertson, Baudelaire’s Fractal

I wanted to end this list with a first-person narrator who enjoys being non-identical to himself. Hazel Brown wakes up one morning in a hotel room to find that she is the author of the complete works of Charles Baudelaire. Baudelaire’s Fractal is a sickening ride of fun and insight through the self-detachment and self-fabrication of reading (and its comorbidity, writing), which “unfolds like a game called ‘I'”. pronoun “is not dislocation or dissociation, but a refreshing shimmer of sensuous clarity.” Hazel surrenders to this sensuality, filled with contempt and erotic sadness, and thus discovers the flirtation, the invention and the possibility inherent in an incoherent “I”.

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Paul by Daisy Lafarge is available from Riverhead Books, a division of Penguin Random House, LLC.

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Banned books will be showcased at Firsts: London’s Rare Book Fair https://commonfolkusingcommonsense.com/banned-books-will-be-showcased-at-firsts-londons-rare-book-fair/ Fri, 12 Aug 2022 13:00:40 +0000 https://commonfolkusingcommonsense.com/banned-books-will-be-showcased-at-firsts-londons-rare-book-fair/ London – Premieres: London Rare Book Fairorganized by the Antiquarian Booksellers Association (ABA), will return from September 16-18 for its 65th edition, with 120 international dealers exhibiting at the Saatchi Gallery in Chelsea. In addition to many returning exhibitors, Firsts London will welcome 49 new stockists for the first time. Among these, Sam Fogg, one […]]]>

London – Premieres: London Rare Book Fairorganized by the Antiquarian Booksellers Association (ABA), will return from September 16-18 for its 65th edition, with 120 international dealers exhibiting at the Saatchi Gallery in Chelsea.

In addition to many returning exhibitors, Firsts London will welcome 49 new stockists for the first time. Among these, Sam Fogg, one of the main art dealers of the European Middle Ages, will exhibit a selection of medieval illuminated manuscripts.

This year’s theme for the fair “Forbidden Books” was inspired by the 100th anniversary of the publication of Ulysses – one of the most famous censored books of modern times – but also responds to contemporary conversations about censorship in literature, media and online. Pom Harrington, ABA President and Chairman of Firsts London, explains:

“Now is an ideal opportunity to celebrate Odysseus and others like him, who have been suppressed, banned or led to the ostracism of their authors for expressing opinions different from what was acceptable when they first appeared. We tend to consider prohibited works as a matter of another era, but it is a subject that is very much of our time. Print has always remained a powerful vehicle for consecrating an acceptance of the plurality of points of view. view. We thought it was a topic that remains very topical and worthy of shining light on.”

Examples of “forbidden books” across the centuries, including fiction and non-fiction, will be displayed alongside other extraordinary books, manuscripts and ephemera.

Scientific controversies

Firsts London will feature important work by scientists who, following their groundbreaking discoveries, have found themselves opposed by religious or state authorities. Sophia Rare Books will exhibit a first edition of Nicolaus Copernicus’ De revolutionibus orbium coelestium (On the revolutions of the celestial spheres), at the price of

£2 million. From revolutionibus (1543) radically changed humanity’s perspective on its relationship to the universe, refuting the widely accepted Ptolemaic model which placed the Earth at the center of everything and suggesting the heliocentric astronomical model, which instead sees the Sun as the center of the system solar. Due to its revolutionary theories, considered heretical by the Catholic Church, the book was eventually included in the infamous Index Librorum Prohibitorum (Index of banned books) from 1616 to 1758.

The Sophia Rare Books stand will also host another great protagonist in the history of science, exhibiting a first edition of Galileo Galilei Dialogue (1632) accompanied by his letter to the Grand Duchess of Tuscany (Latin translation, 1641), texts which both contributed to the trial of the Inquisition of Galilee. On display at York Modern Books is another example of a great scientific discovery – a first edition of Albert Einstein Relativity: the special theory and the general theory (1916). Einstein’s work was banned in Nazi Germany, and later in Austria, where his books were burned in protest against his theories.

Deepening the sciences, and particularly geography and cartography, Daniel Crouch Rare Books will exhibit a selection of atlases and travel diaries banned or banned from publication, such as that of Richard Hakluyt Main navigations (1599), from which the entire report of the Voyage to Cadiz has been removed.

Censored literature

The Fair will also showcase illustrious examples of censored fiction. A genuine original Russian edition of Doctor Zhivago by Boris Pasternak will be exhibited by bookseller Peter Harrington. The book was originally published in Italian in 1957 by publisher Feltrinelli, but remained unpublished in its original language until 1958, when the CIA acquired Feltrinelli’s proofs with the intention of publishing the book in Russian. and to distribute copies to Soviet visitors to the Universal University of Brussels. and international exhibition. Aided by the Dutch intelligence service, the CIA struck a deal with the Dutch academic publishing company Mouton, which resulted in this very first Russian

publication. Peter Harrington will also present a signed first edition of Salman Rushdie satanic verses. The novel, a major work in the canon of magical realism, sparked furious controversy and was consequently banned in several countries around the world.

by James Joyce Ulyssesthe book that inspired this year’s theme, will appear on the stand of Johnson Rare Books, in the form of a unique edition (1933) featuring a prominent original erotic painting inspired by the episode “Circe”.

Other famous forbidden books, each with their fascinating story, will be exhibited by BAS BOOKS. Among them, an original signed edition of DH Lawrence Lady Chatterley’s Lover privately published in 1928, and the first openly published Penguin edition (1961), which was sued for obscenity and later banned in five other countries. Other editions featured include a first signed American edition of lord of the fliesby William Golding and a first edition by Henry Miller Tropic of Cancer in its original binding as published by Obelisk Edition in 1934.

Finally, Rare Books Le Feu Follet will present a collection of controversial French books, including a first edition signed by the author of Charles Baudelaire The evil flowers (1857), from which six poems had been banished, a complete original manuscript of the Marquis de Sade’s last play, Friendship Day (ca. 1810-1812), and a copy of the interdict war pilotsigned and dedicated by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry.

Translations

A number of items presented at the Fair represent defining moments in translation.

James Joyce’s 1928 first edition Ulysses (Yurishizu) in Japanese, inscribed by its translator Ito Sei, will be displayed by Peter Harrington Books. It is the first translation of Joyce’s seminal novel into a non-European language, and predates the work’s publication in England and the United States, before their notorious censorship of the novel was lifted. Much of Molly Bloom’s final soliloquy, the novel’s most outrageous section, has been redacted from volume two of this edition, in an effort to avoid censorship, but in this copy has been reversed into the book on xerox sheets by the translator. Despite this omission of these sections of the novel, the second volume was banned in 1934. It is the only set of the two volumes of the first edition of this translation to ever appear on the market.

The first Russian translation of Karl Marx Das Capital will also appear at the fair, exhibited by Maggs Bros. This is the first translation of the book into any language and, given its influence on world history, arguably the most significant. In one of the great ironies of modern publishing history, Russian censors cleared Das Kapital for publication, dismissing the book as a “colossal mass of abstruse and somewhat obscure political-economic argument”, and concluding that “in Russia few people will read it and even fewer will understand it. Against their predictions, the edition of three thousand copies was quickly sold out, and in 1880 Marx wrote to his friend FA Sorge that “our success is even more big in Russia, where Capital city is read and appreciated more than anywhere else. The book was eventually banned, and the publication of a second edition in Russia was banned during the reign of Tsar Alexander III (1881-1894).

A cabinet of curiosities

In addition to books, the fair will also include a number of rare items and fascinating memorabilia. Among these are a set of French playing cards from 1760, adapted for an unknown board game; a first edition of the most important program of the Ballets Russes, in which appears the first use of the word “surrealism” by Guillaume Apollinaire, as well as 20 handwritten signatures of dancers and artists including Picasso, Cocteau and Léon Bakst; and an inscribed photographic portrait of Sigmund Freud – the only surviving image of him revealing a smile – taken by Jewish photographer Edmund Engelmann in 1938, shortly before he fled to the United States leaving the negative behind. , and recovered only after the war by Freud’s daughter, Anna Freud.

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