10 Funniest Quotes From Downton Abbey: A New Era

Spoiler alert: This article contains spoilers for Downton Abbey: A New Era

Downton Abbey: A New Era hit cinemas earlier this month, transporting audiences back to the interwar period and giving them a dose of good old-fashioned British humour. Although the film features heartbreaking moments, it soothes them with hilarious, sarcastic, stubborn, and witty quotes.

As always, Violet Crawley’s quick wit steals the show, though Mary gives her her money’s worth, demonstrating her ability to pick up where her grandmother left off. Other fan-favorite characters such as Carson and Mrs. Patmore also add their own flavor of humor to the mix.

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scandalous secrets

“With that, I bid you good night and let you discuss my mysterious past.” — Violet.


Violet Crawley in Downton Abbey

The film centers on Violet and the mysterious events that led her to be moved from a French Riviera villa by a man she knew briefly before the birth of her son Robert. When she announces the fact to her family and gives the villa to her great-granddaughter Sybbie, they understandably have a lot of questions that she doesn’t want to answer.

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Reprising her role as matriarch, game master, and comedic mastermind, Violet begins her final chapter with a bang, when she mischievously leaves her family to think and ruminate after dropping this unexpected bombshell.


An Obvious Observation

“They are very French, the French, aren’t they? -Carsson.


Carson is the embodiment of Victorian British values. As demonstrated throughout the television series and accompanying films, he is a character who is afraid of change and anything unfamiliar or life threatening to which he is accustomed. It is obviously no different in A new erawhile the craziest story in the film takes him to France.

Although he does not wish to leave the country, or even Downton, Carson agrees to accompany the family to the French Riviera, believing that he is doing so for Robert’s benefit. Carson is truly a fish out of water in France, providing some of the funniest moments in the film, such as when he shows how French the French are.


brotherly love

“Let’s hope it still works.” – Married.


Mary and Edith’s relationship, full of arguments and disagreements, was turbulent through the seasons, but in their later years it mellowed into a relationship of mutual respect and understanding. Despite this, that doesn’t stop Mary from playfully punching her sister when the opportunity arises.

When Edith reveals she’s back to writing articles, Cora is thrilled to learn that her daughter is using her brain again. At this, Mary coldly interjects with, “Let’s hope this still works.” The good-natured banter shared between the sisters adds a refreshing dynamic to their relationship in the film.

would you rather

“I prefer to earn my living in a mine.” — Violet.


While Violet admits that allowing a film to be made at Downton will help ensure its survival, that doesn’t mean she endorses the medium or the lifestyle of its creators. She makes numerous comments throughout the film about the film’s stars, including actresses in makeup and actors who are just “plastered” and concludes that she would rather work in a mine.


This hyperbolic statement is made all the more hilarious by the accompanying image of Violet in a helmet, wielding a pickaxe and cakes her head-to-toe royal clothes in the coal dust.

lustful thought

“Ready to spring on you, you mean.” — Mrs. Patmore.


Sophie McShera and Lesley Nicol in Downton Abbey A New Era

The staff downstairs are delighted to hear that a film crew are coming to shoot a feature film at Downton Abbey and the women are particularly keen to meet actor Guy Dexter. Addressing Anna, Daisy describes him as “Like a wild animal ready to pounce”, to which Mrs Patmore jokes, “Ready to pounce on you, you mean.”

Related: 10 Best Movies Like Downton Abbey, A New Era

This quick-witted and slightly disapproving quote is made funnier in hindsight when Mrs. Patmore expresses her eagerness to move in with Mr. Mason, somehow making her the animal ready to pounce.


A vehicle for comedy

“Denker, don’t direct me. I’m not a racing car.” — Violet.


Lady Violet Crawley in Downton Abbey

Violet has always been one to tell it like it is, without directly telling it like it is. Her toughest moments are always forgiven, as she delivers her thoughts and opinions using the vehicle of comedy. The film demonstrates this when she struggles to get up from her seat, only to be steered away by her caring but overbearing maid.

Rather than just telling Denker to leave her alone, she takes a more colorful route by emphasizing that she’s not a race car. It softens the blow of the potentially dry and thankless command and perfectly encapsulates Violet’s bossy yet comedic personality.

So vulgar

“I can’t pretend I’m not insulted.” — Violet.


Young Woman Violet Downton

The math saves the day and reassures Robert that he is his father’s son and not the illegitimate child of a Frenchman, as his host at the villa believes. The misunderstanding could have been avoided if Violet had been more direct from the start, but her mischievous nature and Victorian values ​​kept her from getting into the details until later in the film, providing one of the best storylines. of the franchise.


When Robert confesses his fears to Violet, he says, “I can’t pretend I’m not relieved,” to which she responds quickly and curtly, “I can’t pretend I’m not insulted.” Her son’s pun indicates that there is no real resentment behind the blow, though she is mortified to think that anyone would believe her capable of such outrage.

Break the tension

“I hope it was a prop.” – Married.


Downton Abbey A New Era Mary Voiceover

Audiences cringed when the invaluable Miss Dalgleish came upon Mary lending her voice to the actress’ filmed scenes. The awkward moment is exasperated by the former’s response, when she picks up a very expensive-looking vase and smashes it at her feet to show her anger before storming out of the room.

Related: 10 Funniest Opinions About Postboxes From Downton Abbey A New Era

Thinking on her feet, Mary diffuses the tension by uttering, “I hope that was a prop.” Her sharp mind proves that she will be able to fill the void left by her grandmother, Violet Crawley.

Honesty is the best policy

“It’s not your fault that Miss Dalgleish has all the charm of a wart.” — Violet.


Maggie Smith as Dowager Countess Lady Violet Crawley in Downton Abbey

Miss Dalgleish is rude and unfriendly when she first arrives at Downton for filming, but later warms up after a stimulating conversation with Anna and Daisy. However, until then, our main characters are doing their best to avoid the actress at all costs. Violet is no exception and chooses to dine in her room rather than alone with her.

Mary feels guilty for not being there for moral support due to her dating the director, but her grandmother reassures her that it’s not her fault. His decision to compare Miss Dalgleish to a wart subverts audience expectations, making it one of the most undercut and hilarious quotes in the movie and the franchise in general.

The best medicine

“Stop that noise. I can’t hear myself dying.” — Violet.


Violet’s death scene is one of the most heartbreaking moments in the film. Despite this, the Dowager’s quick wit remains intact until her last breath, as evidenced by her last words. Although she knows she is dying, her focus is not on herself or her own potential fears, but on the well-being of those around her.

In an attempt to soothe Denker’s sobs, or more likely to make those close to her laugh, she says, “Stop that noise. I can’t hear myself dying.” Using humor as a coping mechanism is quintessentially British and strongly reflects the era in which the events of the film take place. It’s also essentially Violet and serves as a fitting last line in its final chapter.


Next: Violet’s 10 Best Quotes From A New Era

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